NOW SUPPORTING SIDEWALK OPERA

Coffee Essentials: Roasting

The Common Myth: Roast Determines Strength

One of the most common misconceptions about coffee is the idea that the darker the roast of the bean, the stronger (or more caffeinated) the coffee is after brewing.  I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but this is far from the truth. For example; Our Power of Nature blend has a Light-Medium roast and will give you the massive burst of energy you’d expect from “strong” coffee.

“I like my coffee strong and black” - Me, not so long ago
The two main reasons we roast coffee beans is to enhance the flavor of the coffee and to weaken the structure of the bean itself so that it can be more easily ground up to become soluble in water. 
Fun fact: A coffee bean is actually the seed of a cherry from the Coffea plant. There are two main processes of removing the bean from the cherry (Dry and Wet) and what you are left with is a hard pale green coffee bean ready to be roasted to your preference.  We will discuss this further in a future blog!
Determining Roast Level
The most well known part of roasting is the level in which a coffee bean is roasted to on a scale from <em>Light</em> to <strong>Dark</strong>. Coffee lovers tend to have a preference on how they like their coffee roasted but it may come as a surprise that not all light or dark roasts are equivalent to each other. 
To start, individual coffee roasters determine what is considered Light or Dark based on their own subjective tastes and the profile of the coffee beans they are roasting.  A dark roast from your favorite roaster may be lighter or darker than another depending on the flavor profile they were looking for. 
However, there is an objective way for roasters to determine the roasting level by using a tool called a spectrophotometer, commonly known by the manufacturer name Agtron. The Agtron machine uses the light reflected from a sample batch of coffee beans to accurately determine the roast level and assigns a number from 150 - 0. 
The roasting process really changes up the overall flavor profile of the coffee as it transitions from Light to Dark,  and through experimentation, allows for a widevariety of tastes and aromas for us to enjoy in our morning cup.          
A Wide Spectrum of Aroma and Flavor
While the roasting level of coffee plays an important role in its final taste, the temperature and timing of the roast plays a very significant role in the experimentation process of creating the various notes that we enjoy. The roasting process consists of three stages: DryingBrowning and Roasting.
The Drying stage is the first part of the process and on average lasts about 4-7 minutes. During this stage the moisture content of the bean is being removed and energy is absorbed to prepare for the Roasting stage (an exothermic process). Temperatures of traditional drum roasters are around 320 F or 160 C.
The second stage is the Browning stage which marks the start of the Maillard reaction that is responsible for the browning of the coffee. This is the same type of reaction that occurs when grilling steak and consists of the caramelization of sugars and amino acids. This is responsible for creating the necessary elements needed to obtain the desired flavor and aroma profiles. Changing the timing of this stage can dramatically affect the final notes. Once the coffee begins to POP,known as the first crack, it will have reached the final stage of Roasting. 
The Roasting stage, also known as the Development stage, is where the flavors and aromas develop into the final desired profile. The timing of this stage is incredibly important because you want to ensure that you slow down the roast to prevent it from gaining a smoky taste. 
Through trial and error experimentation of the roasting process and bringing out the unique features of the many different coffee beans from around the world, coffee roasters have been able to create a wide spectrum of aromas and flavors for us coffee lovers to enjoy!

Leave a comment